Increasing Your Emotional Intelligence In One Step

Increasing Your Emotional Intelligence In One StepIncreasing Your Emotional Intelligence

People are generally more reactive than proactive which often can be a good thing. For instance, avoiding an accident while driving with quick reflexes, or your reflexes when a spider lands on you. (I know I personally move like Bruce Lee when one gets on me)

However, there are times when you allow emotions to govern your actions. For instance, think about how you react when you get a difficult email, an unfair assumption, or the moment when you get blamed for an issue at work that you don’t agree with.

A little reflection in these situations can help us to increase our emotional intelligence.

To define, Emotional Intelligence is the ability to recognize, understand, and use the power of emotions to facilitate high levels of collaboration and productivity. It is the foundational competency every leader needs to grow. Emotional intelligence, in essence, is the ability to effectively manage emotions. Emotions precede actions. When you are happy, you smile. It is not the other way around. Emotional intelligence is what drives our actions. This can be learned or trained, and if you work at it, you can have an outstanding outcome.

One tip to increasing your emotional intelligence is known as “the pause.”

If you take a bit of time to just pause, like a few seconds, you will handle situations differently.

Your reactions will adjust because you take a few moments to simply pause and reflect. This will take some work because we are programmed to react quickly.

Added stress or irritations can govern our behaviors & ability to think clearly. The pause will help correct the over exaggerated reactions that often ensue.

Pausing is a good habit to practice and master. You’ll see that success will follow when difficult situations need to be handled.

How to use the pause for the win

The pause will work best if you take a moment to stop and genuinely think before you speak. While this doesn’t sound hard, you’ll want to be sure that you give it some practice. It won’t be second nature for most people.

Ways to pause

Try to do the following in order to utilize the “art of the pause” skillfully:

  1. Go for a walk
  2. Take a few deep breaths
  3. Resist the desire to act out rudely
  4. Stop and reflect
  5. Give yourself some space between the situation, even if it’s an email

Nothing about this is self-centered. It is actually good for you and those around you. The benefits will be seen in your decision making both personally and professionally.

Further reflection

After you have used the pause, take some time for reflection. Ask yourself some questions such as:

  • Why would I have felt that way?
  • What is the purpose of that type of attitude?
  • How can I handle things better in the future? 

Now write it down.

When you have a successful pause for a situation, take some time to write it down. This will help make the pause a habit.

The pause is a wonderful way to increase your emotional intelligence and stand out in the workplace as one that is proactive rather than reactive.

Send us your comments right now… we would love to hear your thoughts about this article.

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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The Five Temptations of a CEO

A commemorative edition of the landmark book from Patrick Lencioni When it was published ten years ago, The Five Temptations of a CEO was like no other business book that came before. Highly sought-after management consultant Patrick Lencioni deftly told the tale of a young CEO who, facing his first annual board review, knows he is failing, but doesn’t know why. Refreshingly original and utterly compelling, this razor-sharp novelette plus self-assessment (written to be read in one sitting) serves as a timeless and potent reminder that success as a leader can come down to practicing a few simple behaviors?behaviors that are painfully difficult for each of us to master. Any executive can learn how to recognize the mistakes that leaders can make and how to avoid them. The lessons of The Five Temptations of a CEO, are as relevant today as ever, and this special anniversary edition celebrates ten years of inspiration and enlightenment with a brand new introduction and reflections from Lencioni on the new challenges in business and leadership that have occurred in the past ten years.

Click here for more info>>>

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Social Media Marketing Predictions

Social Media Marketing Predictions for This Year

Online adults aged 18-34 are most likely to follow a brand via social networking (95%). (Source: MarketingSherpa) Think about your audience and see where they are most likely to follow your brand.

71% of consumers who have had a good social media service experience with a brand are likely to recommend it to others. (Source: Ambassador) Use social media as an effective customer service tool to increase brand engagement and win new customers.

Visual content is 40 times more likely to get shared on social media than other types of content. (Source: HubSpot)

The best time to post on Facebook is 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday. Other optimal times include 12:00–1:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays and 1:00–4:00 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays. (Source: HubSpot)

Send us your comments right now… we would love to hear what is working for you.

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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Do Your Coworkers May Run From You?

Do Your Coworkers May Run From You?

Reasons Your Coworkers May Run From You

Workplace relationships can be complicated. However, you can avoid certain behaviors that will ensure your coworkers won’t run in the opposite direction when they see you approaching.

Be sure not to act like this type of employee: 

You don’t listen to others 

If you don’t listen to others, people will not want to engage with you. Facetime with your coworkers will decrease if you only talk about yourself. When you attend meetings or pass someone in the hall, put your phone down and make eye contact with others which welcomes conversation.

You look for a fight 

If you are argumentative, you will be seen as looking for a fight. People will avoid you like the plague because no one has time for this type of behavior. Don’t throw out criticism and insults by constantly critiquing those around you. You’ll be seen as obnoxious and unprofessional.

You forget to give others credit 

You take the credit when it should have been given to others. Be sure to recognize the accomplishments of others and even offer praise. Stealing the credit of your coworkers will be a surefire way they to anger them and build distrust. 

You are too self-absorbed 

You tend to get so engrossed in your workday that you appear self-absorbed and not willing to engage with others. Your coworkers will feel the brush off and just avoid you in the future. No one likes to work with someone that only thinks about themselves and their agenda. 

You give too much information 

No one wants to hear your life story and latest drama. When you give too much information, people become uncomfortable and lose interest in spending time with you. Further, they will not likely want to work on group projects with you for fear of your latest info overload.

Your goal is 5:00 PM 

You seem more interested in 5:00 PM than the tasks at hand. Coworkers won’t feel that you are keeping the company & employees in your best interest and will want to avoid you. No one wants to work with a loafer or one that is constantly watching the clock.

Don’t be this type of employee. You’ll find that your coworkers won’t engage with you. They will avoid you and perhaps even run in the opposite direction in order to escape the pain of dealing with you.

Do you run from any of your coworkers? Pass this article along to them.

We would love to hear your comments & suggestions. Please contact us today!

Have you taken The ExitMap® Assessment questionnaire? Click to try it at no cost! 

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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Why Employing a ‘Culture Add’ Benefits Your Business

Why Employing a ‘Culture Add’ Benefits Your Business

Reasons Why Employing a ‘Culture Add’ Benefits Your Business

Employers spend part of their hiring resources on personality assessments in hopes of finding the right fit for their company’s culture. While this is important to do, it should not be the only thing you look at with your potential candidate.

When an employee doesn’t stay long in a position, often an employer wonders whether they were the right fit for the culture of the company. Hiring is expensive and time-consuming, which is a drain on any business.

Here are a few things that you can do to help with the recruitment process:

Common Values

A “culture add” is where you can look at the values and behaviors that are non-negotiable for your business. Diversity should be celebrated and embraced. People from a wider range of backgrounds will mean a lot for your success.

Look for the type of attitude that you want in a new employee.

* Will they work well with others?

* Do they have the drive to do whatever it takes to complete the job and meet the deadlines?

These are the values to watch for during an interview.

Personality Traits

Look for the personality traits & soft skills that are most suitable for your business. Profiles & assessments will give you great insights on a candidate. You’ll be able to see if they are a team player, good at solving problems, and if they can work well on their own. Recruiters embrace assessments in order to find the select few that would be a good fit for the company.

The Interview

Use the interview along with the assessments to make a wise hiring decision. If possible, consider bringing your candidate in for a trial day. You’ll gain new information about the person as you watch them interact with others in the office.

Shaping Your Employees

Candidates are not always an open book from the beginning. Assessments will help you identify their strengths & weaknesses. There needs to be room for professional development and growth.  Shape your employees into your company’s culture. Be sure to cover the company’s vision, mission, and core values. Lead by example!

These tips exemplify ways that candidates can be found, and will work out well. The interview, doing assessments, and learning their values will help in the selection process.

We would love to hear your comments & suggestions. Please contact us today!

Did you see our latest post?

Click here to read: How Do I Begin Planning My Exit?

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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How to ensure you accomplish your goals & resolutions!

Here we are, the third month of the year…. How are you doing with your New Year’s resolutions & goals? How to ensure you accomplish your goals & resolutions!

Many people have already forgotten or dismissed the goals they set for themselves… Don’t fall into this trap.

Look back at the previous year and celebrate your accomplishments…. Now set some “realistic” goals that will help improve your performance in all areas of life; personally & professionally. 

Here are some tips to help ensure success. 

Refocus your morning habits

Instead of struggling through the morning before you head to work, regroup and try to set up some good, solid morning habits. Consider pulling back the curtains and letting the sun shine in your windows. Set your coffee the night before and take some time to sit and enjoy it as you read for a few minutes. Make your bed when you get up because it will make your room look tidier.

Brainstorm ways to help you feel more ready and begin to form some new morning habits.

Get some extra sleep

Try to get to bed earlier or set your alarm later. Often, it becomes easy to do one more thing around the house or to check email one more time to get ready for the next day. Try skipping this and get some extra sleep instead.

Take time to read daily

We live in a world where you can watch TV or videos on any mobile device at any time. Rather than focusing on so much screen time, consider reading about 30 minutes per day. Find something encouraging to read which will nurture your mind.

Get out of your rut

You still have time to do something new this year. Try to get out of your rut and embrace something that you haven’t done before. This is a great way to enjoy life and make it feel less mundane.

Consider what you’re thankful for

Work and life can be busy. It is easy to get overwhelmed, so take time out to write down what you are thankful for. Seeing it on paper will enhance your attitude and allow you to feel more positive and grateful, which will help you at work too.

Network with someone each week

Rather than getting stagnant, be sure to network with someone each week. We learn so much from others and they can be an encouragement too. Be sure to take time out each week to build relationships by connecting with others.

Make this your most productive year ever!

Need more tips on how to be more productive & focused?  Contact us today!

Did you see our latest post?

Click here to read: The First Step to Understanding the Complexities of Preparing a Company for Transition

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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Surefire Ways to Get Promoted

Surefire Ways to Get Promoted

Surefire Ways to Get PromotedWouldn’t you like to know how to secure an upcoming promotion? Imagine being able to tap into your supervisors thought processes and learn what it takes to get promoted. These tips will enable you to understand more of what bosses look for as they make their promotion decision. Stand out and you’ll find yourself in a new role by doing the following:

Do the right thing.

Supervisors likely promote those that do the basics well. In other words, do the right thing when it comes to showing up on time, not gossiping, and treating everyone with respect.

Set your mind on the big picture.

One way to get promoted is to think like the owner with a long-term vision. The big picture is important and your supervisor will note you are thinking ahead rather than just about the day to day tasks of the company.

Play nice with others.

No one likes to work with someone who is difficult to get along with. Work hard to be a team player. Your boss and coworkers will appreciate it and respect you more. Be present when the workload gets hard rather than shirk from the responsibility.

Take initiative whenever you can.

If you want to get promoted, then you’ll want to be seen as one who takes initiative. Accept tough assignments, don’t complain, and give your all to the tasks you are to handle. Your boss will be looking for someone who is willing to step up to the plate rather than one who must be asked repeatedly to help.

Be a leader.

Promotions often go to the employees that are considered leaders. You can show your strengths by extending advice, a hand, or your skills to assist others. People will take note when you have expertise in a variety of areas. Lead by example and be sure you follow the company’s policies and procedures.

Allow your passion to be evident.

You are hungry for advancement and passionate about the company. Make sure that you allow our passion to shine through your work each day. Don’t be shy to let people know you want to lead, grow, and advance your career in ways that benefit the team.

Networking is the key to your success.

Spend your time networking with the people that can help you learn more about the role you hope to secure. In other words, try and find team members that have been in that role before or supervise the person who has that position. Networking will enable you to learn more about the role which will give you a better chance to secure the position.

Need more tips on how to get promoted? Contact us today!

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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New Laws Banning the Salary History Question

New Laws Banning the Salary History Question

New Laws Banning the Salary History QuestionPotential new laws are on the horizon that would ban employers asking questions about salary history during the interview process. Restrictions in Massachusetts, Delaware, Oregon, New York City, San Francisco, and Philadelphia have already passed legislation that prohibits employers from requesting salary information from job candidates. Hefty fines will be imposed on those that do not comply.

These laws are becoming more prevalent in order to counteract the disadvantages that salary history requests put on women and other minority groups. Often employers do not intend to use the info given about history against the candidate but bias opinions can creep in if the history is discussed.

Here are some recommendations to ensure that you adhere to such laws and prepare in advance for those that may come into play in your municipality.

Employers should avoid asking about salary history.

Once the information is out on the candidate’s pay history, it can never be taken back and could affect the thought processes of the employer. The gender gap is a real problem and minorities suffer too when it comes to prior salary history. Let it not even become a factor and simply don’t discuss it during the interview process.

Focus on the open position and the pay expectation.

Rather than discussing salary history, employers should talk with their candidate about the responsibilities and skill sets necessary required for the position. The conversation should be a two-way street where both of you discuss the expectations when it comes to salary.

Be sure that Human Resources have made the salary amount clear as far as what the company will pay. Go into the interview ready to discuss options with your candidate. Previous salary history should not have a bearing on what they will get paid.

Know that this is not just for female candidates.

The laws banning the salary history question are not only to protect women. In fact, this is important for all candidates and an essential element to a company’s culture. Avoiding these questions shows that you are unbiased and pay based on what suits the role and candidate that accepts the position.

In any situation, you want to be sure that you handle salary questions with attention and detail. The laws that have been put in place and are coming in the near future will help to protect candidates and keep employers an unbiased mindset. The compensation discussion should be beneficial to both the candidate and company. Work to keep these conversations positive with the goal to eliminate any unfair practices.

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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The First Step to Understanding the Complexities of Preparing a Company for Transition

The ExitMap® Assessment questionnaire consists of 22 questions and produces a high-quality 12-page summary report which will be emailed to you. The report ranks the overall preparedness of a company for transition and provides a breakdown of the four major categories of readiness; Finance, Planning, Profit/Revenue, and Operations.

ExitMap Assessment Widget

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

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How Do I Begin Planning My Exit?

How Do I Begin Planning My Exit? 

Business owners frequently approach exit planning much like a new fitness routine. They know it is necessary, but it always seems to be something that can be put off until tomorrow.

For the Baby Boomers, tomorrow is already here. Business owners who were born between 1945 and 1964 make up 25% of the population, but own over 60% of the small businesses. This is the result of their surge into the job market in the 1970s, and the lack of room in corporate America to absorb a much larger and better educated employee population. From 1975 until the middle 1980s, Baby Boomers opened new businesses at a rate never seen before, and not duplicated since.

Today, over 5,000,000 Baby Boomers are preparing for retirement. Just as when they all went to college, started new businesses, and became prolific consumers, they will create a flood of small business sales in the United States.

The generation that is now reaching ownership age is much smaller, and less inclined to entrepreneurship than the boomers. They are also being hotly pursued by corporate America, which needs to replace their retiring generation of Boomer managers and executives. These three factors combine to create a “perfect storm” of competitive pressures when marketing a small business for sale.

Exit planning is quickly becoming a buzzword in the legal and financial communities. Although boomers are healthier than prior generations, they will all retire eventually. Tens of thousands of professional advisors are positioning themselves to provide tax, risk management, wealth management and contract preparation services to this flood of sellers.

The most effective and efficient approach to exit planning is to select a single professional who can manage all the others in the process. Creating new entities or sale agreements is pointless unless the tax implications are first understood. Planning to reduce the impact of income taxes may be rendered moot if a company is not in position to sell. Putting the company up for sale may be a disaster if an owner doesn’t understand what buyers are looking for, and how much they’re willing to pay.

An effective and lucrative exit plan frequently takes up to five years to plan and execute. It starts by examining the strengths and weaknesses of the business, IT systems, management team, and customer base. With that information, you can realistically set expectations about who a likely buyer might be and how much you will realize after taxes. If you would like to have a preliminary conversation about starting your exit planning process, please contact us.

Gary Brunson
gary@myclearfocus.com

Debra Rider
debra@myclearfocus.com

574.361.2674

Sustainable Growth & Profit Consultant, Coach, Mentor and Counselor/Therapist for Business Owners and Professional.

© 2018, MPN Inc.

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